Budget Monitoring And Citizen Participation In The Netherlands

IndischeBuurt2

Indische Buurt (Amsterdam) Photo: Zeynep Gunduz

My name is Noureddine and I am a member of the training group that deals with budget monitoring. We have examined the prospects paper for 2013. On page 26 of the bill it is stated that in 2013 there will be 197 million euros in expenses. We’ve got an overview of the financial statements of 2011, which states that the district spent 243 million euros in 2011. Are we correct in understanding that over the next three years, spending will be cut by 46 million euro? In 2016, the expenditure is budgeted at 179 million. Meaning a 64 million difference. Was that the intention?

The expenditure in the social domain in 2011 was 68.7 million euros. If you look at the budget in the perspectives note, you end up with a total of 59 million for the social domain (counted are: work, income and economy, education and youth, welfare and care, sports and recreation, culture and monuments). This means that the social issues will receive almost 10 million euros less in the next 3 years.

Introduction
Thus spoke Noureddine Oulad el Hadj Sallam, one of the participants in the experiment Budget monitoring in the Indische Buurt (Indische Neighborhood) in Amsterdam during the meeting of the Council Committee Social of the municipality of Amsterdam (city district east) in June 2012. His speech addressed the content of the municipality’s perspective paper for 2013.

Noureddine’s speech signifies a unique moment in the Netherlands. Not only because a citizen without a financial educational background commented on the expenditure of the budget made by a governmental organization. But also because it led to a change in the way the local government determines the priorities of the prospective budget for 2014; namely, in co-creation with citizens. Co-creation entails collaborative decision-making concerning the allocation of the budget by citizens and civil servants. It is an important contribution to the enhancement of civil society within the Netherlands.

This paper describes the methodology of budgetmonitoring and its operationalization via the project in the Indische Neighborhood. The 12-month pilot project was realized by The Centre for Budget Monitoring and Citizen Participation, in collaboration with E-motive, University of Applied Science in Amsterdam (HvA), MOVISIE and members of local communities in the neighborhood. Read more

Zeynep Gunduz & Marjan Delzenne – Budget Monitoring And Citizen Participation In The Netherlands

Indische Buurt - Amsterdam Photo: Zeynep Gunduz

Indische Buurt – Amsterdam Photo: Zeynep Gunduz

This paper describes the methodology of budgetmonitoring and its operationalization via the project in the Indische Neighborhood. The 12-month pilot project was realized by The Centre for Budget Monitoring and Citizen Participation, in collaboration with E-motive, University of Applied Science in Amsterdam (HvA), MOVISIE and members of local communities in the neighborhood.

The launch of the Center for Budget Monitoring and Citizen Participation in the Netherlands
The idea to implement budget monitoring in the Netherlands was initiated by E-Motive of Oxfam-Novib. E-Motive connects knowledge and expertise from developing countries to Dutch professionals. In 2010, E-Motive introduced a group of social professionals in the Netherlands to INESC (Institute of Socioeconomic Studies), the expert on budget monitoring in Brazil. A year-long intense co-operation between active citizens and social workers from the Netherlands and INESC led to the launch of the Center for Budget Monitoring and Citizen Participation (Stichting Centrum voor Budgetmonitoring en Burgerparticipatie) in Amsterdam in December 2011. Read more

The Socio-Economic Rights Institute of South Africa (SERI)

www.seri-sa.org. The Socio-Economic Rights Institute of South Africa (SERI) is a non-profit organisation providing professional and dedicated socio-economic rights assistance to individuals, communities and social movements in South Africa.

SERI conducts applied research, engages with government, advocates for policy and legal reform, facilitates civil society coordination and mobilisation, conducts popular education and training, and litigates in the public interest (the SERI Law Clinic is registered as a public interest law centre).

Our thematic areas are:

  •  housing and evictions;
  •  access to basic services; and
  •  political space.

Housing and Evictions

Of all socio-economic rights, the right of access to adequate housing has been the most developed through Constitutional Court cases, many of which have been actively participated in by SERI’s co-founders. This means that there is a body of work to use as a basis of advocacy and litigation.

However, while jurisprudence has established, for example, that poor people should not be evicted without the government providing adequate alternative accommodation, a number of crucial gaps remain. One of these is that there is insufficient research on the nature and attributes of alternative accommodation required by people under threat of eviction. Another is the need to combat state efforts to exclude classes of people from the provision of alternative accommodation as a means of narrowing the scope of their obligations to provide housing. Yet another is the lack of a co-ordinated civil society sector response to deficiencies in the implementation of housing policies. Agendas remain to be developed, and community-based organisations do not receive the necessary expert assistance from lawyers and policy specialists to properly develop and implement the agendas that they have identified without assistance. Too many community-based organisations (CBOs) lack the resources necessary to resist forced evictions and engage critically with pre-determined upgrading and relocation plans, which are often presented to them as faits-accomplis.

Read more: http://www.seri-sa.org/

Housing Finance Programme for Sub-Saharan Africa 2013

Following on from a very successful offering in October 2012, the University of Cape Town and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania are again offering a one week course on housing finance in Sub-Saharan Africa, from 7 – 12 October 2013, in Cape Town, South Africa.  The programme will be held at UCT’s Graduate School of Business Breakwater Campus, located at the V&A Waterfront.  Lectures will follow a structured lesson plan but will allow for open discussion between participants, presenters and discussion leaders.  The course blends academic principles with practical, real-life applications.  Case studies will be used where appropriate.

Teachers and presenters in the programme are recognised leaders in the housing and real estate field, and have experience in housing ifnance system development and transformation.  Instructors are drawn from the Wharton School, UCT Department of Construction Economics and Management, and UCT Department of Finance and Tax, and FinMark Trust’s Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa.  In addition, a number of highly qualified industry specialists will participate in the programme.

read more: http://www.housingfinanceafrica.org/document/housing-finance-programme-for-sub-saharan-africa-2013/

Zolani Moya – Minister Sexwale Launches Affordable Housing Scheme

Photo - Shack Dwellers International - nextcity.org

Photo – Shack Dwellers International – nextcity.org

Sabc.co.za. May, 9, 2013

The latest housing project by the department of Human Settlements aims to give low income earners an opportunity to own their houses.
This project targets people earning between R3500 and R15 000 per month for a housing subsidy of up to R87 000 and they can apply for finance for houses up to R300 000.
The first phase of the projects includes 430 units worth nearly R15 million in Port Elizabeth.

Thembinkosi Peter is the first South African to benefit from this housing project, he works for the South African Police force’s support services.
This project has enabled him to buy the two bedroomed house after struggling for years to acquire a bond. Peter lives with his wife and young daughter. “It’s a life changing experience and I am very happy about this thing that government has done, we have been renting, struggling getting places but it’s much better, I am going to have my own house with family”, says an ecstatic Peter.

The project targets people earning between R3500 and R15 000 per month for a housing subsidy of up to R87 000.
The subsidies for the beneficiaries is provided through the Finance Linked Individual Subsidy programme.

Read more: http://www.sabc.co.za/Minister-Sexwale-launches-affordable-housing-scheme

Anywhere But Here: Deserted Banking Empire Turned Skyscraper Slum

torredavid

messynessychic.com

messynessychic.com. May, 7, 2013. It was built for stockbrokers and bankers in their thousand dollar suits to make million dollar deals, but for nearly two decades it has held the less impressive title of the world’s tallest squat. Welcome to the Centro Financiero Confinanzas, more commonly known as the Torre David (the Tower of David) in Caracas, Venezuela, an unfinished skyscraper which has now been colonised by an ad hoc community of over 700 families.

Read and see morehttp://www.messynessychic.com/banking-empire-turned-skyscraper-slum/


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