freepressunlimited.org ~ Zambian Women Have Their Say

Photo: Freepressunlimited.org

Photo: Freepressunlimited.org

The majority of the Zambian population who live off of less than a dollar a day are women. Through the Mama Sosa project, 30 Zambian women were trained in how to use media to shed light on their everyday challenges.

Mama Sosa means “Woman speak!” in the local Bemba dialect. The main share of the Zambian population who live off of less than 1 dollar a day are women. This makes them the largest marginalised group in the country. And their situation is even worse in the slums of Lusaka, home to 80% of the capital’s population. Here, women not only have to deal with poverty, but are also exposed to crime and prostitution-related violence on a daily basis.

The local media barely pay attention to these issues. According to Free Press Unlimited’s Programme Coordinator Nada Josimovic, women in Zambia are seen as second-rate citizens. As a consequence, they hardly have any opportunities to have their say: “If the media pay attention to women at all, they are usually treated in a very stereotypical manner.”

In the small-scale pilot project Mama Sosa, Free Press Unlimited worked together with the Zambian youth organisation House of Consciousness (HOC) to improve women’s situation in the capital. Nada Josimovic enthusiastically tells us about the project’s unexpected success.

Read more: https://freepressunlimited.org/zambian-women-have-their-say

Bookmark and Share

Shanu ~ How Rent Control Act Hurts Delhi Tenants & Landlords Alike

dehli post.jagran.omData show that nearly half of Delhi’s population lives in slums or unauthorised colonies. Among various other reasons, the Delhi Rent Control Act, which has been challenged in the Delhi High Court recently, is responsible for the present state of affairs. The Act, its critics claim, hurts the interests of landlords and tenants in equal measures. Landlords in the national capital’s central locations such as the City Zone, the Sadar, Paharganj Zone, Karol Bagh Zone and Civil Lines do not pay house tax because their earnings from these rent-controlled properties are meagre. Tenants of such properties also refrain from paying taxes because they fear that the property will fall out of the rent control regime if they pay the tax. Apart from making housing expensive, rent control laws are also the reason why many buildings in Delhi are poorly maintained.

However, Delhi’s experience is not unique. Throughout the world, rent control laws make housing expensive and hurt the interests of landlords and tenants, especially the low-income households. Unlike other Asian countries such as Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan which became prosperous as they made housing affordable by repealing rent control laws. In fact, rent control laws were imposed in most countries during the World War-II but were either repealed or mellowed over the next few decades. In Delhi, where the Rent Control Act was imposed in 1939, the law went through an evolution till 1959, but did not undergo major changes.

Read more: https://www.proptiger.com/how-rent-control

Bookmark and Share

Kleine dorpen ~ geen sociaal vangnet voor de meest kwetsbare ouderen

vpl_2016_4_17_24.inddOndanks de vergrijzing en verschraling van het voorzieningenniveau is het dorp nog altijd een aantrekkelijke woonplek voor de oude dag. Het sociaal vangnet biedt soelaas wanneer ouderdomskwalen zich aandienen. Bevestigt ook het SCP-rapport ‘Kleine gebaren’. Maar niet voor iedereen, isolement en eenzaamheid is voor de meest kwetsbare ouderen een hardnekkig probleem, zelfs in kleine dorpsgemeenschappen.

Het SCP-rapport ‘Kleine gebaren’ maakt deel uit van het onderzoeksprogramma De Sociale Staat van het Platteland (SSP). De afgelopen tien jaar is de sociale conditie van het platteland vanuit diverse invalshoeken onder de loep genomen in een reeks rapporten. Daarin lezen we hoe dorpen van karakter veranderen en gaandeweg ook stedelijke trekjes krijgen. In dit jongste rapport onderzoekt Lotte Vermeij van het SCP wat dorpsgenoten betekenen voor het groeiende aantal ouderen in dorpen. Een actueel thema in een tijdsgewricht waarin ouderen langer zelfstandig willen wonen, ook als zich gebreken aandienen. En de overheid uit financiële noodzaak de rem zet op de toenemende behoefte aan voorzieningen voor ouderen. Het gevolg hiervan is dat ouderen die hulp aan huis nodig hebben, in de toekomst steeds vaker een beroep moeten doen op de mensen in hun omgeving. Het SCP wil weten wat dit betekent voor ouderen in kleine dorpen waar voorzieningen speciaal voor ouderen doorgaans ontbreken. Hoe is het daar gesteld met de zelfredzaamheid? In hoeverre zijn dorpsgenoten bereid om bij te springen? Een andere reden om dit rapport tegen het licht te houden, is de vraag of grotere dorpen en steden op dit punt iets kunnen leren van kleine dorpsgemeenschappen? Zijn er overeenkomsten, of zijn de omstandigheden in kleine dorpen juist heel uitzonderlijk?

Eenzaamheid ligt op de loer
In ‘Kleine gebaren’ nuanceert het SCP het clichébeeld van het kleine dorp als een hechte gemeenschap waar ‘noaberschap’ vanzelfsprekend is en dorpsgenoten automatisch voor elkaar klaar staan. De enquête onder 7000 bewoners van dorpen met minder dan 3000 inwoners, wijst uit dat ouderen over het algemeen uiterst tevreden zijn met hun dorp, slechts een kleine minderheid ziet dat anders. Wel neemt het aantal contacten met dorpsgenoten op oudere leeftijd geleidelijk aan af. En hun beeld van het dorp wordt op oudere leeftijd iets minder rooskleurig. Ouderen die zichtbaar onthand zijn, kunnen op een helpende hand rekenen. De mate van aansluiting bij dorpsgenoten speelt niet zo’n grote rol bij de praktische hulp die ouderen nodig hebben. De waarde van contacten ligt op een ander vlak. Het onderhouden van dorpscontacten blijkt vooral een buffer te zijn tegen sociaal-emotionele problemen. Daar zit gelijk ook de grootste pijn bij de meest kwetsbare ouderen, met name bij bewoners die van een laag inkomen moeten rondkomen. Zij missen de aansluiting en raken hierdoor steeds verder in een isolement. En dan ligt eenzaamheid op de loer. Deze dorpsbewoners laten zich somber uit over de lokale omgangsvormen. En geven aan dat ze geen behoefte hebben aan hulp. Het laat zich aanzien dat deze ouderen hun verwachtingen al veel eerder naar beneden hebben bijgesteld. Read more

Bookmark and Share

Emily Badger ~ How To Make Expensive Cities Affordable For Everyone Again

Bay

Picture: www.zimbio.com

Last week, we wrote about a new report from the California Legislative Analyst’s Office that found that poorer neighborhoods that have added more market-rate housing in the Bay Area since 2000 have been less likely to experience displacement. The idea is counterintuitive but consistent with what many economists theorize: Build more housing, and the cost of it goes down. Restrict housing, and the cost of it rises. If you’re a struggling renter, you’re better off if there’s more housing for everyone.

Many readers responded by saying “of course! supply and demand!” as if we’d just uncovered the obvious. Many others responded “of course! supply and demand!” — by which they meant, facetiously, that market dynamics clearly don’t work this way in neighborhoods like the Mission in San Francisco, where poor residents feel pushed out by tech workers moving in.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/expensive-cities

Bookmark and Share

Emily Gordon ~ ‘We Are Nobody’s Diaspora’ — How Caribbean Culture Has Been Preserved

Photo: en.wikipedia.org

Photo: en.wikipedia.org

The art of storytelling is widely regarded as the oldest form of education, entertainment and cultural preservation.
In fact, some assert society can be transformed by storytelling.

Christopher Laird’s keynote address at the 18th Annual Africana Studies Student Research Conference and Luncheon explored this notion in Bowling Green State University’s Olscamp Hall Friday.
In his address “Nobody’s Diaspora? Africa in the Moving Picture Memory of the Caribbean,” the film producer, director and writer discussed how Caribbean culture has been preserved and shared through a digital archival process that has helped record aspects of Caribbean culture and politics and project it across the world.

The address’s title was inspired by Trinidadian author and activist Marion Patrick Jones, who spoke out against the concept of “being someone’s diaspora,” a scenario in which the effects of European and American colonialism and imperialism frames Caribbeans as  “overseas” Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Africans.

Read more: http://www.sent-trib.com/we-are-nobody-s-diaspora

Bookmark and Share

Adam Greenfield ~ Where Are The World’s Newest Cities … And Why Do They All Look The Same?

Ills.: en.wikipedia.org

Ills.: en.wikipedia.org

At present we share our planet with some 7.5 billion other human beings, and as swollen as that number may already sound, it is projected to hit 10 billion before levelling off sometime around the middle of the century.

Global population may never scale the vertiginous peaks foreseen in the panicky neo-Malthusian literature of the mid-20th century, chiefly Paul and Anne Ehrlich’s famous jeremiad of 1968, The Population Bomb. Nor will overpopulation’s effects, as they fold back against the cities of the global north, much resemble the apocalyptic depictions in the era’s pop culture; 1973’s Soylent Green, for example, opens with a title card informing the viewer that 40 million souls reside in the smog-choked New York City of 2022, and that seems more than a little hard to imagine now. But neither is it a state of affairs one can dismiss casually. Every last one of those 10 billion human beings is going to need a place to live.

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/where-world-newest-cities

Bookmark and Share

  • About

    Rozenberg Quarterly aims to be a platform for academics, scientists, journalists, authors and artists, in order to offer background information and scholarly reflections that contribute to mutual understanding and dialogue in a seemingly divided world. By offering this platform, the Quarterly wants to be part of the public debate because we believe mutual understanding and the acceptance of diversity are vital conditions for universal progress. Read more...
  • Support

    Rozenberg Quarterly does not receive subsidies or grants of any kind, which is why your financial support in maintaining, expanding and keeping the site running is always welcome. You may donate any amount you wish and all donations go toward maintaining and expanding this website.

    10 euro donation:

    20 euro donation:

    Or donate any amount you like:

    Or:
    ABN AMRO Bank
    Rozenberg Publishers
    IBAN NL65 ABNA 0566 4783 23
    BIC ABNANL2A
    reference: Rozenberg Quarterly

    If you have any questions or would like more information, please see our About page or contact us: info@rozenbergquarterly.com
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Follow us on Twitter


  • Ads by Google
  • Archives