Dutch Caribbean Digital Platform

dcdp

The Dutch Caribbean Digital Platform is online since 2 November 2015
We – the University of Curaçao Library – are in the process of optimizing the system and building our collections. Much of the content still has ‘restricted access’. For these items, we are in the process of clearing copyright issues. If you are the copyright owner of one of these items, please contact us through library@uoc.cw or call Margo Groenewoud, (5999) 7442236.

Upcoming events
In November and December 2015, we will organise meetings both on Curaçao and in The Netherlands to demonstrate the platform to our stakeholders. We need your help to open up us much content as possible, in the interest of our community and for optimal use in education and research.
If you want to know more or want to be invited to one of these meetings, please let us now through library@uoc.cw.

See: http://dcdp.uoc.cw/

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Shervin Nekuee ~ Historische bescheidenheid

Was ik vijf jaar eerder geboren dan was ik in 1978 bij het ontwaken van de revolutie in Iran een zestienjarige en bruikbare pion geweest in de onzichtbare hand van de geschiedenis. Ik was of de kant van de radicale islam opgegaan of een extremistische communist geworden of ik was omgekomen in
de loopgravenoorlog tussen Iran en Irak. Het is mij allemaal bespaard gebleven. Niet omdat ik de juiste morele keuzes heb gemaakt of heldendaden heb verricht. Nee, ik was simpelweg te jong.

Ik heb geen partij hoeven kiezen. Ik was te groen en derhalve nog onbruikbaar toen de meest turbulente gebeurtenissen uit de recente geschiedenis van Iran – mijn land van herkomst – zich voordeden. In een land dat in strijd was verwikkeld met zichzelf en daarnaast zo ongeveer met de hele wereld, heeft mijn leeftijd mijn leven en geweten gered.

Dit ‘toevalsbesef’ is een dwingend besef. Het zou moeten leiden tot bescheidenheid in het oordeel over hoe we ons verhouden tot de vulkanische momenten van de menselijke geschiedenis. De mens neemt deel aan de geschiedenis en heeft te maken met keuzes tussen goed en kwaad: vaker nog, tussen kwaad en erger. Maar wij zijn niet de makers van de geschiedenis, vaak zelfs niet die van onze persoonlijke levensloop.

Felix Meritis, Vrijheidslezing, 4 mei 2012

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Critique Of Heaven And Earth Equality ~ Religion And Political Emancipation According To Karl Marx

Introduction
Both left-wing and right-wing parties and movements claim to defend Western Values while demonstrating against Islam or against Islamophobia and Populism. From both sides we hear words like Liberty and Equality. Both sides are pointing to the Enlightenment as the core of European Values. When defending ‘European Civilisation’, everyone points to the French Revolution and its Manifesto, the Declaration of Human Rights. The French struggle against privilege, for equal political rights was the start of the political emancipation of the citizens that after 1789 spread all over Europe.

I think we all agree that the legacy of the French Revolution is worth to be defended, but there is a new struggle going on about its Interpretation: do the European Values come in a ready-made package, to be accepted and implemented by the whole world or at least by everyone coming to Europe? Or is the French Revolution still an unfinished business and do we still have to struggle for the realisation of equality and liberty in our societies? I would like to show you why I am of the opinion that the latter is the case, by looking more closely into the heritage of this project for liberty and equality from the 18th century.
I will do so, using a text of the German thinker Karl Marx. (Trier, 5 may 1818 – Londen, 14 march 1883) He is mainly known for his economical ideas about Capital and Labour, but his political texts are in no means less insightful.

If you want to know how equal and free a society is, it is always a good idea to look at the rights of those who are looked upon as ‘different’ from everybody else. Those who claim equal treatment because they are being discriminated against. Marx does exactly this. He addresses an issue that was debated fiercely during the 19th century, just like it is today. I am talking about the relation between State and Religion. Back then the big issue was the position of Jews in society. The state was not secular, but Christian, and Jews were second-class citizens with less rights than our minorities have now. Things are different today, but we can still recognize the questions of the 19th century: does Jews have to renounce their religion in order to obtain full citizenship? Are Jews a threat to society because of their different customs and religious practices? Today, we would never pose these questions in relation to Jews. But they are openly discussed in relation to Muslims.

Marx, of Jewish origin himself, intervenes in 1843 in the debate, publishing the essay Zur Judenfrage. On the Jewish Question, is written 24 years before Capital. In this text, he laid a fundament for his later work. The text is a polemic reaction to an earlier article called Jewish Question from Bruno Bauer, who belonged to the same philosophical-political group as Marx, the Hegelians.
His first point, which is crucial, is a change of perspective: while discussing the Jewish Question, do not look at the behaviour and aspirations of the Jews, but look at the role of the State. Marx uses the Jewish Question to analyse the mechanism of political emancipation in a modern society. In this endeavour, the criticism of religion is the condition of a criticism of politics.

Criticism of religion: what religion and political emancipation have in common
What are we talking about? We are talking about human rights. We have to realise that the original Declaration from 1789 was called Declaration of the rights of Man and of the Citizen (French: Déclaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen) In 1948, when the UN adopted the Declaration it became the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Citizen disappeared.
That is striking, since the core of the analysis by Marx lies in the difference between ‘Man’ and Citizen’. In his words, between emancipation as such and political emancipation. By letting the Man and the Citizen fuse into the Human, an essential procedure of political emancipation is covered up. Who is this ‘Man’ in the Declaration?

Niemand anders als das Mitglied der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft. Warum wird das Mitglied der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft ‘Mensch’, Mensch schlechthin, warum werden seine Rechte Menschenrechte genannt? Woraus erklären wir dies Faktum? Aus dem Verhältnis des politischen Staats zur bürgerlichen Gesellschaft, aus dem Wesen der politischen Emanzipation. (p.363-364)
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Felix Meritis 2003 ~ Georgische week ~ Repetitie Supra!

In 2003 vond in Felix Meritis de Georgische week plaats, een uitwisselingsprogramma tussen Nederland en Georgië.
Onderdeel was de voorstelling Supra!, een co-productie van Ferrie de Geus & Noortje Bijvoets met dansers van de wereldberoemde volksdansschool in Kutaisi en acteurs van het Kutaisi Drama Theatre.

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Digital Library Of The Caribbean

digitalThe Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is a cooperative digital library for resources from and about the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean. dLOC provides access to digitized versions of Caribbean cultural, historical and research materials currently held in archives, libraries, and private collections.

Go to: http://www.dloc.com/

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The Real Adam Smith: Ideas That Changed The World

The Real Adam Smith: A Personal Exploration by Johan Norberg, takes an intriguing, two-part look at Smith and the evolution and relevance of his ideas today, both economic and ethical. It’s difficult to imagine that a man who lived with horse drawn carriages and sailing ships would foresee our massive 21st century global market exchange, much less the relationship between markets and morality. But Adam Smith was no ordinary 18th century figure. Considered the “father of modern economics,” Smith was first and foremost a moral philosopher. The revolutionary ideas he penned in The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments, changed the world. Norberg explores Smith’s insights regarding free trade and the nature of wealth to the present, where they are thriving and driving the world’s economy.

In the second hour, Ideas That Changed The World, Norberg traces Smith’s insights regarding the benefits of free trade and the nature of wealth to the present, where they are currently in operation. He talks with some of the most distinguished Adam Smith scholars, as well as leaders of some of the world’s most admired companies to discover how Smith’s ideas continue to be relevant and drive the global economy today.

Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php

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