Katy Fentress – Kenya Vision 2030: Slum Upgrading in Soweto

urb.im – 2012, July, 17 – In September 2000, Kenya was one of 189 countries that signed an international treaty called the Millennium Declaration. The object of the declaration was to define a common worldwide vision for development that was to be achieved by the year 2015.
The Kenyan government drafted these resolutions into a development paper of its own, entitled “Kenya Vision 2030.” The paper spells out how the government intends to turn Kenya into “a globally competitive and prosperous nation with a high quality of life by 2030.”
Kenya Vision 2030 is anchored on three key pillars: economic, social, and political governance. It contains a pledge to improve the quality of life of all Kenyans, including those living in substandard conditions within the major city slums.

Katy Fentress, Nairobi Bureau Chief and Community Manager

Read more: Kenya Vision 2030

The urb.im network is a global community working for just and inclusive cities. It connects practitioners in six cities and throughout the world to establish an international community of practice and learning, sharing ideas and experiences in order to innovate, replicate, and scale working solutions to the problem of urban poverty. urb.im is a project of Dallant Networks and the Ford Foundation.

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China Allocates 20k Hectares for Low-Income Housing

chinadaily.com. August 8, 2012. BEIJING — China has allocated more than 20,000 hectares of land to support the construction of low-income housing this year, an official with the Ministry of Land and Resources said Tuesday.
The nation plans to distribute 47,600 hectares of land for low-income housing projects in 2012, more than the 43,600 hectares allocated last year, Vice-Minister Hu Cunzhi said at a seminar on low-income housing policies.
China has stepped up the construction of low-income housing in recent years, as skyrocketing home prices have triggered public complaints.
Housing prices have shown signs of rebounding over the last few months, after the government eased its grip over credit control to buoy the slowing economy.
The government has maintained its previously-adopted tightening measures such as higher down payments and property tax trials to cap home prices.
It has vowed to build 36 million affordable housing units during the 2011-2015 period to meet the demand from low-income families. In 2011, it started construction on 10 million units.

Read more: China Allocates 20k Hectares for Low-Income Housing
– With Links to More Stories to China’s Housing Policy

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Vivek Wadhwa – In Chile’s Slums, a Lesson in How to Make Apps for Social Good

www.washingtonpost.com. April, 2, 2012 – How many of the hundreds of thousands of mobile phone applications seek to do truly great things, such as lift people out of poverty or improve health care for the poor?
The App Economy, to date, has largely touched the lives of those living in the developed world. This is due, in part, to the high cost of smart phones but also because app development has lacked real vision and purpose. I have found that Silicon Valley, generally speaking, doesn’t build apps to save the world or lift people out of poverty. It builds them to sell Angry Bird t-shirts and generate lots of virtual currency.
The folks at Centro de Innovación in Santiago, Chile, aim to change that.

I met Julian Ugarte, an Industrial designer, and his team during a recent trip to South America, and I was blown away by what they are trying to do. On March 22, Ugarte and Centro de Innovación launched a contest with Movistar — a mobile subsidiary of Telefonica — and TechoLab, a non-profit subsidiary of Un Techo para mi País (UTPMP) — a pan-Latin American NGO that dispatches youth volunteers on projects to eradicate the extreme poverty that affects tens of millions in Latin America. A $10,000 prize will be given to each of the creators of the best three apps that address problems facing the millions of people living at the bottom of the pyramid (BoP).

Read more: V. Wadhwa – In Chile’s Slums a Lesson in How to Make Apps for Social Good

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India, Brazil And South Africa Address The Challenge Of Slums

The World Bank Institute. March 22, 2012

India, Brazil, and South Africa share common development patterns, economically, socially, and politically, and together can not only learn from each others’ successes and challenges, but also become major players in the geo-political space.

While Brazil has already achieved a high level of urbanization, tested different policies and approaches to address the slum challenge, and therefore can share many lessons of what has worked, what did not work, and why, it still struggles to address the extreme inequality between its rich and poor; it still has 44 million people living with inadequate urban housing or utilities.

India is one of the most rapidly growing economies in the world and has a large urban population although its urbanization level is relatively low. Faced with the challenge of improving the governance framework and service levels in cities, India has formulated groundbreaking urban policies in the last decade but despite these initiatives, its almost 93 million people living in slums will probably double in the next twenty years.

South Africa has made significant progress in designing progressive policies and intergovernmental fiscal transfer systems to address apartheid’s legacy of inequality. Although South Africa has delivered formal housing to 3 million households since the fall of apartheid, it recognizes that there is a lot still to be done to address the challenge of nearly 12 million people living in shacks or precarious shelters.

Read more: http://wbi.worldbank.org/india-brazil-and-south-africa-ibsa-addressing-challenge-slums


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