African Studies Centre Leiden ~ Open access

The African Studies Centre Leiden is the only multidisciplinary academic knowledge institute in the Netherlands devoted entirely to the study of Africa. It has an extensive library that is open to the general public. The ASCL is an interfaculty institute of Leiden University.

The ASCL adheres to the so-called Berlin Declaration on free access to electronic publications, which means that all ASCL publications are available in open access as far as possible. The African Studies Collection, ASCL Working Papers, African Studies Abstracts Online, ASCL Info Sheets and African Public Administration and Management, which are all published directly by the ASCL, can be downloaded free of charge from this website. There is an embargo period for books published by external publishers but when this has expired, these can also be downloaded from the ASCL website free of charge.

Go to: http://www.ascleiden.nl/content/open-access

More Open Access publications:

Bookmark and Share

The Belizean Garifuna ~ Organization Of Identity In An Ethnic Community In Central America

If the world had any ends, British Honduras would certainly be one of them. It is not on the way from anywhere to anywhere else’ (Aldous Huxley 1984:21).
When I had to do fieldwork in the Caribbean region for my final research several years ago, someone from the department of cultural Anthropology in Utrecht in the Netherlands asked me why I didn’t go to Belize. My answer to his question was at that time quite significant: ‘Belize??’  I had no idea where it was and could not picture it at all.
Libraries that I visited in the Netherlands hardly provided any solace. Most of the books on Central America hardly mentioned Belize. Booth and Walker describe the position of the country as follows in ‘Understanding Central-America’: ‘Though Belize is technically Central America, that English-speaking microstate has a history that is fairly distinct from that of the other states in the region. At present this tiny republic, which only became formally independent from Great-Britain in 1981, does not figure significantly in the ‘Central American’ problem’ (1993:3).

Multi-Ethnic Belize
The fact that Belize receives little attention in literature on Central America underlines the peripheral position of the country in this region. Some authors qualify it as part of the Caribbean world; others primarily see Belize as a member of the British Commonwealth. Besides that it is also seen as part of the Central American context. The Formation of a colonial Society (1977) by the English sociologist Nigel O. Bolland was the first scientific work on Belize that I was able to acquire. The Belize Guide (1989) by Paul Glassman provided me with a tourist orientated view of this ‘wonderland of strange people and things’ (Glassman 1989:1). Collecting sustaining literature was and remains a tiresome adventure. Slowly but surely my list of literature expanded.
My knowledge of the region was limited. Reactions from others also confirmed that Belize is a country with a slight reputation. For example, I still remember being corrected by someone from a travel agency. After asking the gentleman if a direct flight to Belize existed, he answered somewhat pityingly: ‘Sir, you must mean Benin´. In my circle of friends, Belize also turned out to be unheard of. The neighboring countries Guatemala and Mexico are better known. An important reason for this is that the media informs people of the most important happenings in these countries. This information is often clarified using maps of the area on which Guatemala and Mexico, but also Belize, are marked. Nonetheless, time and time again Belize turns out to be a country that does not appeal to the imagination.
The comments I heard from tourists coming in from Mexico or Guatemala are notable. ´This is a culture shock´, ´where are the Indians´, ´this doesn´t look at all like Central America´, ´it´s surprising how well you can get by with English here, that was not like that at all in Mexico´. Many of the tourists that come from Mexico quickly go through Belize city on their way to one of the islands off the coast of Belize where they relax for a few days before going to Guatemala. Most of the tourists coming into Belize from Tikal (Guatemala) spend a night in San Ignacio, comment on the fact that everything is so expensive, and quickly travel on to Chetumal (Mexico) the next day.
Belize is a country that lies hidden between two countries with a certain reputation. I do not really think that it is an exaggeration to state that Belize is something of a fictitious end of the world, as formulated by Huxley. In order to obtain an impression of the country, in which this research took place, the next section gives a general idea of the topographic and climatic characteristics. Besides that, the compilation of the population, the constitutional and political situation, the economic position, the religious context and the multi-lingual structure of the country are discussed successively. Furthermore, it is essential to provide an outline of the historic context in which the various ethnic groups in Belize have taken in their place. In other words: How has this country come to be so multi-ethnic?

Belize, A Central American Country on the Periphery
On 21 September 1981, the former British Honduras becomes independent. This date is the formal end of a process of independence that took seventeen years. In 1964, British Honduras of the time received the right to an internal self-government and in 1973 the name of the country was changed to Belize. With an area of 22,965 km2, Belize is the second smallest country in Central America. El Salvador is smaller (21,393 km2), but has considerably more inhabitants with it’s population of 5.889,000. According to the census of 1991, Belize has just 189,392 (Central Statistical Office 1992). This comes down to eight inhabitants per square kilometer, whereas El Salvador has 275 inhabitants per square kilometer. With that, the two countries are each other’s opposites in Central America, Belize is the most sparsely populated and El Salvador the most densely.

Google Images

Belize

Geography
Belize borders on Mexico in the north, on Guatemala in the west and the south, and on the east the country borders on the Caribbean Sea. The area along the coast consists mostly of marshland with dense mangrove forests, mouths of rivers, lagoons and, every now and again, a sandy beach. Countless small and large rivers, that have played a crucial part in the infrastructure throughout the centuries, run through the country. Much of the wood chopped in the inland found and finds its way towards its destination at the coast via these waterways. It can rain abundantly in Belize in the months May to November, especially in the south, and then the waterways swell up to become rapid rivers.

Climate
The climatic conditions in Belize vary from tropical in the south to subtropical in the north. The climate is warm and the temperature varies between twenty-seven and forty degrees Celsius. It was especially the humidity, with an average of 85% in the southern part of the country that drew heavily on the physical condition of this researcher. The country officially has two seasons. The dry season, that lasts from November to June, and the wet season from June to November. During the wet season, tropical depressions regularly develop in the Caribbean region that reveal themselves as hurricanes. For this reason, this season is also called the hurricane season. This destructive force of nature has hit Belize several times in this century. The hurricanes of 1931, 1955 and 1961 have not failed to leave behind a trail of disaster.

The season in which it is relatively dryer than the rest of the year takes up a few months in the north (February to May), while in the south it only lasts several weeks (Dobson 1973:4). In fact, there is no telling what the weather will do in Belize. A Belizean friend of mine says the following on this matter: ‘We have two seasons here, a dry and a wet season; they generally take place on one and the same day’. Read more

Bookmark and Share

The Purchase Of The Farm Braklaagte By The Bahurutshe ba ga Moiloa – Whose Land Is It Anyway? (1908-1935)

Pisani1

Basking in the early morning sun
Photo: Michelle du Pisani

Braklaagte, registered as farm number 168 on the Transvaal farm register (the number was changed in the second half of the twentieth century to JP-90), was 3,152 morgen and 529 square rood in size, which is equal to 2,700.5441 ha in metric measurements.

The first title deed to the farm was registered in October 1874 in the name of Diederik Jacobus Coetzee. Ownership of the farm was transferred several times to other white farmers. W.M. Beverley was the last white owner before the farm was bought by the Bahurutshe ba ga Moiloa.

In 1906 a dispute arose in the Bahurutshe ba ga Moiloa tribe of Dinokana in Moiloa’s Reserve between Abraham Pogiso Moiloa and Israel Keobusitse Moiloa. When Abraham’s father, Ikalafeng, had died in 1893 he was a minor and Israel, Ikalafeng’s younger brother, would for a number of years act as regent. When Israel had to hand over the bokgosi (chieftainship) to Abraham in 1906 differences arose between them. A section of the tribe, led by Israel, moved eastward and settled at Leeuwfontein.

Already in 1876 Leeuwfontein had been bought for the tribe by chief Sebogodi Moiloa of Dinokana at the price of 200 head of large cattle, equivalent to about £1,000, but the transfer of the farm to the tribe had not yet been effected. ‘Quite an exodus’ of the Bahurutshe ba ga Moiloa took place from Dinokana to Leeuwfontein and by 1907 the majority of Israel’s adherents had settled there.
Read more

Bookmark and Share

‘Aan deze zijde van de utopie’ ~ De wijsgerige antropologie van Helmuth Plessner

PlessnerWie een thuis zoekt, een vaderland, geborgenheid, moet zich uitleveren aan het geloof. Maar wie vasthoudt aan de geest, keert niet terug. Telkens weer zijn andere ogen nodig om op een andere manier zichtbaar te maken wat allang gezien, maar niet bewaard kon blijven. ~ Helmuth Plessner

De afgelopen decennia laten een groeiende belangstelling zien voor het werk van de Duitse bioloog, filosoof en socioloog Helmuth Plessner (1892–1985). De organisatoren van het eerste Internationale Plessner Congress, dat in 2000 in Freiburg plaatsvond, durfden zelfs te spreken van een Plessner Renaissance. Misschien is dat enigszins ongelukkig uitgedrukt, omdat eigenlijk alleen van een wedergeboorte gesproken kan worden in Duitsland en Nederland, de twee landen waarin hij werkzaam is geweest. Buiten deze beide landen is het werk van Plessner tijdens diens leven vrijwel onopgemerkt gebleven, zodat daar eerder gesproken moet worden van een late geboorte van een Plessner-receptie. En zelfs in Duitsland en Nederland, waar Plessner een zekere bekendheid verwierf als een van de grondleggers en belangrijkste vertegenwoordigers van de twintigste-eeuwse wijsgerige antropologie en ook als een scherpzinnig interpreet van de ideeënhistorische wortels van het nationaalsocialisme, heeft zijn werk altijd in de schaduw gestaan van zijn tijdgenoot Martin Heidegger (1889-1976).

Voor het aanvankelijk uitblijven van een omvangrijke werkingsgeschiedenis van Plessners gedachtegoed zijn meerdere redenen te noemen. In de eerste plaats is er nog maar weinig vertaald van zijn omvangrijke oeuvre, waarvan een substantieel deel tussen 1980 en 1985 door Suhrkamp is uitgebracht onder de titel Gesammelte Schriften in 10 Bänden.[i] Bovendien zijn, met uitzondering van de Nederlandse, de meeste van deze vertalingen (in het Italiaans, Nederlands, Engels, Spaans, Frans, Pools en Russisch) van recente datum, en dan gaat het voornamelijk om artikelen en andere kleine geschriften.[ii] Zijn omvangrijke filosofische hoofdwerk, Die Stufen des Organischen und der Mensch (1928), is tot op heden onvertaald gebleven (hoewel er al enige tijd een Engelse vertaling in de maak is).

Dat zijn omvangrijke oeuvre tot dusver te weinig aandacht heeft gekregen, komt ook doordat Plessner na de machtsovername door Hitler als Halbjude zijn universitaire lesbevoegdheid in Duitsland verloor en van 1933 tot 1952 – met uitzondering van de jaren tussen 1943 en 1945, waarin hij als onderduiker op verschillende adressen in Utrecht en Amsterdam verbleef – werkzaam was in Groningen, eerst als buitengewoon hoogleraar sociologie en later als hoogleraar filosofie. Deze bijzondere omstandigheden hebben ertoe bijgedragen dat hij aanvankelijk nauwelijks school heeft gemaakt. En voor zover Plessner zelf deel uitmaakte van een filosofische ‘school’ – die van de wijsgerige antropologie[iii] – werd de praktische samenwerking met de twee belangrijkste mederepresentanten, Max Scheler (1874-1928) en Arnold Gehlen (1904-1976), verhinderd door respectievelijk een verstoorde persoonlijke verhouding en een tegengestelde politieke ideologie.
Met dat laatste hangt wellicht de derde reden samen voor de vertraagde receptie van Plessners werk. Zijn bereidheid om zijn eigen denken altijd weer kritisch te blijven bezien, viel op een weinig vruchtbare bodem in een eeuw die bijzonder vatbaar was voor totalitaire verleiding. Waar tijdgenoten als Heidegger en Gehlen de totalitaire ideologie van het nationaalsocialisme omarmden, belichaamt Plessners werk een radicale scepsis ten aanzien van iedere totalitaire ideologie.

Een dergelijke scepsis heeft ook aan het begin van de eenentwintigste eeuw nog niets aan betekenis verloren. In dat licht bezien komt de historische biografie van Carola Dietze als geroepen. Plessners persoonlijkheid, biografie en werk zijn namelijk nauw met elkaar verbonden. Het duidelijkst komt dat tot uitdrukking in zijn politiek gemotiveerde geschriften. Zijn pleidooi voor een open pluralistische samenleving in Grenzen der Gemeinschaft: Eine Kritik des sozialen Radikalismus (1924) vormt een reactie op de overspannen utopische gemeenschapsidealen die in de Weimar-republiek zowel door rechts – de national-völkische beweging – als links – de communisten – werden uitgedragen. En in het in Groningen geschreven en in Zürich gepubliceerde Das Schicksal deutschen Geistes im Ausgang seiner bürgerlichen Epoche (1935, in 1959 in een uitgebreidere editie heruitgegeven onder de titel Die Verspätete Nation: Über die politische Verführbarkeit bürgerlichen Geistes) analyseert hij de religieuze, sociale en filosofische wortels van het nationaalsocialisme, de beweging die hem veroordeelde tot het bestaan van politiek vluchteling. Read more

Bookmark and Share

Levende-Doden ~ Afrikaans-Surinaamse percepties, praktijken en rituelen rondom dood en rouw ~ Inhoud

Pijl‘De dood (of de zinspeling op de dood) maakt mensen kostbaar en aandoenlijk’ – Jorge Luis Borges in ‘De onsterfelijke’ (De Aleph, 1949)

Inhoud

Proloog: Anansi en Dood
1. Inleiding: we leven lekker hier
I – Identificaties & attitudes
2. Wortels & wording
3. Kruis & kalebas
4. De ander & de observator

II – Memento mori
5. Doodstijding & bekendmaking
6. Rituele organisatie & zorg

III – Dede oso
7. Achtergrond & actualiteit
8. Actoren & symbolen
9. Uitvoering & afsluiting

Read more

Bookmark and Share

Levende-Doden ~ Proloog

PijlAnansi en Dood[i]

Dit is een verhaal over Anansi. Verhalen over Anansi zijn onuitputtelijk. Dit verhaal gaat over Anansi en Dood. Dood woonde niet in de stad bij de mensen. Waarom was hij hier? Wat bracht hem hier? Anansi! En Dood is nadien niet meer weggeweest.

Op een dag had Anansi niets te doen. Hij had geen eten en zei tegen Akoeba: “Moet je horen. Ik ga kijken of ik wat eten kan vinden. Maak alles voor me klaar.” Akoeba nam een rugzak, een boog en een paar pijlen en vishaken. Ze pakte alles in voor Anansi om mee te nemen.
Anansi vertrok. Hij ging diep ’t woud in. De hele dag liep hij, maar hij vond niets. Net toen hij op het punt stond terug te gaan, zag hij een hut een eindje verder ’t bos in. En zoals de ouderen zeggen: “Waar rook is, daar moeten mensen zijn.”
Anansi liep naar de hut. Hij zag iemand zitten in de deur van de hut. Hij zei: “Hallo, vriend.”
De man antwoordde: “Goeie dag meneer, wat doet u hier?”
Anansi antwoordde: “Ik ben Anansi en heb een hele dag naar werk gezocht maar niets gevonden.
Vanmorgen zei ik tegen mijn vrouw, pak wat dingen voor me in, dan ga ik kijken of ik wat vlees kan vinden om mee naar huis te nemen. Maar, zoals u ziet, vader, ik sterf van de honger.”
De man zei: “Kom binnen, kom binnen. Blijf niet in de deuropening staan, kom erin.”
Anansi ging de hut in. Hij ging zitten en zei weer: “Vader, ik sterf van de honger.”
Broer Dood vroeg: “Weet je niet met wie je spreekt? Weet je niet wie ik ben?”

Anansi antwoordde: “Nee, vader.”
Dood zei: “Wel, ik ben Dood.”
Daarop ze Anansi: “Zo, dus hier woont Dood.”
Dood antwoordde: “Ja,” en hij vervolgde: “Ga maar naar het kookhuis. Daar zie je gerookt vlees hangen boven de kookplaats. Neem een stuk, ga zitten en eet. Ik geef je er een beetje water bij, want iets anders heb ik niet.”
Anansi nam een groot stuk van het dijbeen. Hij at en at. Dood keek naar hem en zei: “Nou zeg, je bent wel hongerig!”
Anansi zei: “Nou en of.” Hij bleef maar dooreten tot alles op was. Dood gaf hem wat water. Anansi dronk het op.
Nadat Anansi gedronken had, keek hij de hut rond. Dood vroeg: “Waarom kijk je zo rond?”
Anansi antwoordde: “Eén ding zou ik u willen vragen, vader.”
Dood zei: “Wat wil je vragen?”
Anansi antwoordde: “Ziet u, de hele dag heb ik gelopen. Mijn vrouw en kinderen thuis hebben nog niet gegeten. Kunt u me ook een stuk voor hen meegeven?”
Dood zei: “Ja hoor, neem een stuk.”
Anansi nam zo’n groot stuk dij, dat het bijna niet in zijn rugzak paste. Maar dat hinderde hem niet.
Hij duwde en propte, tot dat ’t erin zat. Toen vertrok hij.
Fluitend en zingend liep hij de weg terug naar huis. Thuisgekomen riep hij: “Akoeba, Akoeba, ik ben eindelijk thuis. God had medelijden met mij en wees me een plaats waar ik voedsel kan vinden.”
Akoeba vroeg: “Waar is het?”

Anansi antwoordde: “Midden in het bos. Ik hoef me geen zorgen meer te maken over werk, want daar is altijd voedsel.”
Akoeba waarschuwde hem: “Anansi, wees voorzichtig hoor, als je zo ver weg gaat.”
Anansi antwoordde: “Maak je geen zorgen over mij. Daar is voedsel. Ik ga nu eten.”
Het verhaal gaat verder. Op een ochtend stond Anansi op. Hij wilde Akoeba niet vertellen waar hij naar toe ging. Hij nam een meelzak mee en gooide die over zijn schouder. Ook nam hij een houwer om zich een weg door ’t bos te kappen. Toen vertrok hij. Hij liep en liep. Toen hij niet terug kwam begon Akoeba ongerust te worden: “Waar blijft Anansi zo lang?”
Anansi kwam bij de hut waar Dood woonde. Hij keek rond. Niemand was thuis. Hij opende de deur van het kookhuis, glipte naar binnen en vulde de meelzak met vlees. Toen vertrok hij. Niemand wist wat hij gedaan had, niemand zag hem.
Dood kwam thuis. Ging de kamer in en verkleedde zich. Daarna liep hij naar ’t kookhuis.
“Hee?, het lijkt net alsof er iemand geweest is. Ik had zoveel vlees en nu is er zoveel van weg.” Hij dacht er niet langer over na.
Een volgende keer deed Anansi precies hetzelfde. Hij ging telkens weer terug. Maar op een dag bleef Dood thuis om hem op heterdaad te betrappen. Hij wist nog steeds niet wie het vlees wegnam. Hij verstopte zich in het huis. Het duurde niet lang of hij hoorde Anansi komen. Anansi keek rond. Alles leek normaal.
De deur was niet afgesloten. Hij gluurde in de kamer, maar zag niemand. Hij ging het kookhuis binnen naar de kookplaats. Vulde zijn zak met vlees en gooide hem over z’n schouder.
Toen hij de hut wilde verlaten, pakte Dood hem vast. Hij zei: “Zo, dus jij bent het die dit spelletje met me speelt. Jij bent het die al die dingen van me gestolen hebt.”
Anansi zei niets. Plotseling sprong hij het raam uit. Hij rende en rende met de Dood vlak achter hem aan. Ze renden het hele eind door ’t bos. Toen ze in de Putcher-buurt kwamen (de wijk waar Mevrouw Putcher woonde) keek Anansi om. Hij zag Dood vlak achter zich. Hij schreeuwde tegen iedereen daar in Poelepantje: “Doe de deuren en ramen dicht. Dood komt eraan. Doe de ramen en deuren dicht. Dood komt eraan!”
Zo volgde Dood Anansi tot in de stad en hij is sindsdien niet meer weggegaan. Daarom gaat iedereen nu dood.
Read more

Bookmark and Share

  • About

    Rozenberg Quarterly aims to be a platform for academics, scientists, journalists, authors and artists, in order to offer background information and scholarly reflections that contribute to mutual understanding and dialogue in a seemingly divided world. By offering this platform, the Quarterly wants to be part of the public debate because we believe mutual understanding and the acceptance of diversity are vital conditions for universal progress. Read more...
  • Support

    Rozenberg Quarterly does not receive subsidies or grants of any kind, which is why your financial support in maintaining, expanding and keeping the site running is always welcome. You may donate any amount you wish and all donations go toward maintaining and expanding this website.

    10 euro donation:

    20 euro donation:

    Or donate any amount you like:

    Or:
    ABN AMRO Bank
    Rozenberg Publishers
    IBAN NL65 ABNA 0566 4783 23
    BIC ABNANL2A
    reference: Rozenberg Quarterly

    If you have any questions or would like more information, please see our About page or contact us: info@rozenbergquarterly.com
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Follow us on Twitter


  • Ads by Google
  • Archives