Freedom On The Net 2018

Fake news, data collection, and the challenge to democracy

Governments around the world are tightening control over citizens’ data and using claims of “fake news” to suppress dissent, eroding trust in the internet as well as the foundations of democracy, according to Freedom on the Net 2018.
At the same time, the regime in China has become more brazen in providing like-minded governments with technology and training that enable them to control their own citizens.
“Democracies are struggling in the digital age, while China is exporting its model of censorship and surveillance to control information both inside and outside its borders,” said Michael J. Abramowitz, president of Freedom House.

These trends led global internet freedom to decline for the eighth consecutive year in 2018.
“This year has proved that the internet can be used to disrupt democracies as surely as it can destabilize dictatorships,” said Adrian Shahbaz, Freedom House’s research director for technology and democracy. “Online propaganda and disinformation have increasingly poisoned the digital sphere, while the unbridled collection of personal data is breaking down traditional notions of privacy.”

Key findings from Freedom on the Net 2018:
– Declines outnumber gains for the eighth consecutive year. Out of the 65 countries assessed in Freedom on the Net, 26 experienced a deterioration in internet freedom. Almost half of all declines were related to elections.
– China trains the world in digital authoritarianism: Chinese officials held trainings and seminars on new media or information management with representatives from 36 out of the 65 countries assessed by Freedom on the Net.
– Internet freedom declined in the United States.
– Citing fake news, governments curbed online dissent: At least 17 countries approved or proposed laws that would restrict online media in the name of fighting “fake news” and online manipulation.
– Authorities demand control over personal data: Governments in 18 countries increased surveillance, often eschewing independent oversight and weakening encryption in order to gain unfettered access to data.

Read more – Full Report: https://freedomhouse.org/freedom-net-2018

image_pdfimage_print
Bookmark and Share

Europeana Blog

On this blog, discover stories and content from Europeana Collections, which provides access to over 50 million digitised items – books, artworks, recordings and more.

Europeana works with thousands of European archives, libraries and museums to share cultural heritage for enjoyment, education and research.

Europeana is an initiative of the European Union, financed by the European Union’s Connecting Europe Facility and European Union Member States. The Europeana services, including this website, are operated by a consortium led by the Europeana Foundation under a service contract with the European Commission.

The European Commission does not guarantee the accuracy of the information and accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to the information on this website. Neither the European Commission, nor any person acting on the European Commission’s behalf, is responsible or liable for the accuracy or use of the information on this website.

Go to: https://www.europeana.eu/portal/en

 

image_pdfimage_print
Bookmark and Share

JSTOR.org

JSTOR provides access to more than 12 million academic journal articlesbooks, and primary sources in 75 disciplines.

We help you explore a wide range of scholarly content through a powerful research and teaching platform. We collaborate with the academic community to help libraries connect students and faculty to vital content while lowering costs and increasing shelf space, provide independent researchers with free and low-cost access to scholarship, and help publishers reach new audiences and preserve their content for future generations.

JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that also includes Artstor, Ithaka S+R, and Portico.

Go to: https://about.jstor.org/

image_pdfimage_print
Bookmark and Share

H. K. Breslauer ~ The City Without Jews

www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org The City Without Jews is a 1924 expressionist film by Austrian filmmaker H. K. Breslauer, based on the novel of the same title by Hugo Bettauer.  The novel and film predicted the rise of anti-Semitism in Europe in the following decades.  The original pressing of Bettauer’s novel, published in 1922, became a wide success and sold over 250,000 copies.  The film premiered on July 25, 1924.  Shortly after the premiere of the film Bettauer was murdered by Nazi party member Otto Rothstock, who was quickly released from jail after public outcry surrounding his conviction.  The City Without Jews film was shown in public for the last time in 1933 at the Carré theater in Amsterdam as a protest against the rise of Hitler’s Germany.

In 2015 a copy of the film in good condition was discovered at a flea market in Paris.  A crowd-funding campaign was launched by the Austrian Film Archive to restore the film, to which over 700 people contributed a total of $107,000.  The film was digitally restored and re-released in early 2018.

The book in German:  Gutenberg.org – Hugo Bettauer – Die Stadt ohne Juden: Ein Roman von übermorgen

image_pdfimage_print
Bookmark and Share

Jonathan Carey ~ Centuries Of Persian Manuscripts, Now At Your Fingertips

These two images come from the miniature book, Ghazalīyāt-i shaykh Saʻdī, containing excerpts of classical Persian poetry. Library of Congress, African and  Middle East Division, Near East Section Persian Manuscript Collection

In the weeks leading up to the vernal equinox, it’s common to see people across Iran busily clearing their homes of clutter. Rugs hang outside in preparation for a good beating, to rid them of a year of dust. This is all done in preparation for Nowruz, also known as the Iranian or Persian New Year. The holiday typically falls around March 20 but is celebrated for weeks with a variety of celebrations, ceremonies, and traditions. So who says the Library of Congress can’t get in on the festivities?

To wish you a Nowruz Pirouz, the library has made 155 rare Persian manuscripts, lithographs, and books dating back to the 13th century available online for the first time. The collection of illuminated manuscripts includes texts such as theShahnameh, an epic poem about pre-Islamic Persia likened to the Iliad or the Odyssey, along with written accounts of the life of Shah Jahan, the 17th-century Mughal emperor who oversaw construction of the Taj Mahal. Other manuscripts focus on religion, philosophy, and science. Some are written in multiple languages, with passages in Arabic and Turkish. This wide range highlights just how cosmopolitan the collection is.

Go to: https://www.atlasobscura.com/persian-manuscripts-online

image_pdfimage_print
Bookmark and Share

Steun de Quarterly ~ Van files en aanvallen

Een jonge lezer

Het gaat goed met de Rozenberg Quarterly. Niet alleen het bezoek aan de site stemt tevreden, ook blijven er maar stukken en boeken binnenkomen voor plaatsing online.
Dat plaatsen kost tijd. Omdat we die werkzaamheden naast ons werk doen, hebben we op dit moment weer een flinke file van boeken en stukken die online mogen.
Die file willen we graag oplossen door meer tijd in de RQ te steken.

Daarnaast zijn de basiskosten van de site flink gestegen door de voortdurende digitale aanvallen. Die aanvallen zijn grotendeels het werk van digitale pubers als we naar de gebruikte software kijken. Maar ook worden we om de zoveel tijd serieus bedreigd vanuit verschillende landen, waardoor we in extra beveiligde netwerken worden gehost. De kosten daarvoor bedragen ondertussen bijna drieduizend euro per jaar.

In een tijd waarin wetenschap en journalistiek steeds verder onder vuur komen te liggen, willen wij, koppig als we zijn, de inhoud van de site gratis toegankelijk houden.
Daarom doen we een beroep op onze lezers:
Help ons de Quarterly in de lucht te houden.

U kunt uw bijdrage overmaken naar:

ABN AMRO Bank
tnv Rozenberg Publishers
IBAN NL65 ABNA 0566 4783 23
BIC ABNANL2A
reference: Rozenberg Quarterly

Of ga naar de donatiebuttons in de rechterkolom.

 

 

image_pdfimage_print
Bookmark and Share
  • About

    Rozenberg Quarterly aims to be a platform for academics, scientists, journalists, authors and artists, in order to offer background information and scholarly reflections that contribute to mutual understanding and dialogue in a seemingly divided world. By offering this platform, the Quarterly wants to be part of the public debate because we believe mutual understanding and the acceptance of diversity are vital conditions for universal progress. Read more...
  • Support

    Rozenberg Quarterly does not receive subsidies or grants of any kind, which is why your financial support in maintaining, expanding and keeping the site running is always welcome. You may donate any amount you wish and all donations go toward maintaining and expanding this website.

    10 euro donation:

    20 euro donation:

    Or donate any amount you like:

    Or:
    ABN AMRO Bank
    Rozenberg Publishers
    IBAN NL65 ABNA 0566 4783 23
    BIC ABNANL2A
    reference: Rozenberg Quarterly

    If you have any questions or would like more information, please see our About page or contact us: info@rozenbergquarterly.com
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Follow us on Twitter

  • Archives