8% Is Reading This On A Tablet

NumbersThe Quarterly is steadily growing. On 1 December 2014 we were happy about having published 1800 articles, now, 6 months later, we have 2200 articles online.

Visits to the site continue to increase. This month, May 2015, we are approaching 15.000 monthly visitors. A 50% increase compared to last year. We are seeing an exceptionally large increase in the last 2 months, since in January we had 9.000 monthly visitors on average.
When we break down the numbers, there’s still slightly more male visitors to the site than female: 54 to 46 percent.
Sixty percent of our visitors is younger than 35 years old. Eleven percent is over 55.
Sixty-five percent of our visitors is on a desktop computer, 27% uses their mobile phone and 8% is reading this on a tablet.

The rise of the USA in the top 10 of visiting countries is notable. Almost a third of our visitors is from that country (27.8%). Also notable is the rise of Kenya, which is now 4th behind the Netherlands and South Africa. People from 154 countries have visited the Quarterly, although 26 countries only supplied a single visitor.
Together, they visited 160.928 articles between May 18, 2014 and May 18, 2015.

Top 10 of most visited pages/articles:

1. Home page ~ 12.317 visits
2. Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni – The Ndebele Nation ~ 11.886
3. Heinz Kimmerle – Ubuntu and Communalism in African Philosophy and Art ~ 10.943
4. Knud S. Larsen, Reidar Ommundsen & Kees van der Veer – Attraction and Relationships ~ 10.807
5. Immanuel Wallerstein – Is another world really possible? ~ 8.916
6. Anthony Court – Hannah Arendt’s Theory of Totalitarianism – Part One ~ 5.452
7. Anthony Court – Hannah Arendt’s Theory of Totalitarianism – Part Two ~ 4.238
8. Anshu Padayachee & Ashwin Desai- Post Apartheid South Africa and the Crisis of Expectation – DPRN Four ~ 2.400
9. Jan Bart Gewald – Gold, the True Motor of West African History ~2.347
10. Sonia Nieto – Diversity Education: Lessons for a Just World ~ 2.308

We are in the luxury position of receiving many article submissions. Over 300 articles are currently awaiting publication.

We have published 4 new sections in the last few months. Two of them deal with the Great Dutch Empire (East & West Indies), the third one consists of the Proceedings of the IIDE Conferences, and in the fourth we are publishing research by the Bonger Institute.

We are looking to expand the website, which means we need funding. Besides calling on our readers for donations, we will begin placing ads on our website. Starting with Google Ads, but other advertisers are welcome.
If your institute or department is interested in presenting publications in a dedicated section, please contact us.

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Gushwell Brooks ~ Reporter’s Notebook: Joburg, A Tale Of Two Cities

Photo: Sam Ncube in front of the second building we visited as part of our investigation into abandoned buildings in Johannesburg CBD.

Photo: Sam Ncube in front of the second building we visited as part of our investigation into abandoned buildings in Johannesburg CBD.

If you had to ask Gauteng Premier David Makhura or Johannesburg Mayor Parks Tau to describe the city of Johannesburg, they would tell you that it is “a World Class African City”. It makes sense: that is how you get politicians and businessmen from Shanghai, Washington DC, Berlin and New Delhi to board business class flights and private jets to sign multibillion rand deals in Africa’s most valuable square mile. With all due respect to Abuja and Lagos, Johannesburg is where the heart of the African economy beats.

Add to that Johannesburg’s international, cosmopolitan appeal with trendy fashions, expensive supercars and cool nightlife, and it makes you feel as if you are in the middle of Manhattan on a Friday night. Beneath the glitter and glam, money is sheltered from the underbelly of a Darwinian struggle for survival, where poverty and deprivation leave human beings tussling for basic essentials such as food, shelter and even water.

Read more: http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/a-tale-of-two-cities

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David Smith ~ Johannesburg’s Ponte City: ‘The Tallest And Grandest Urban Slum In The World’ – A History Of Cities In 50 Buildings, Day 33

“On the 13th and 14th floor you could get anything from a blow-job to an acid trip in a few minutes. Essentially, the building was hijacked.”

In his penthouse apartment on the 52nd floor, Mike Luptak is talking about the bad old days when Ponte, the tallest residential building in the southern hemisphere, fell into the hands of drug dealers, gangsters, pimps and prostitutes. The inner core of this 173-metre high concrete cylinder became a giant rubbish tip piled up as far as the fifth floor. Among the refuse and junk were, so legend has it, the bodies of residents who took a suicidal leap.

A great deal has changed since then. Featured in newspaper articles, photography exhibitions, documentaries and movies, Ponte has come to symbolise the rise and fall and rise again of South Africa’s commercial capital. It is part of an inner-city renaissance in recent years that has seen previous no-go areas turned into gourmet food markets, artists’ studios and trendy apartments.

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/ponte-city

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Al Jazeera ~ Riaan Hendricks ~ Working On Water

LagosJazeeraNigerian architect Kunle Adeyemi is pioneering floating buildings to solve the issues of flooding and land occupation that affect hundreds of thousands in African coastal cities, including the 85,000 residents of the Makoko slum in Nigeria’s capital Lagos.

Adeyemi envisages a city of floating buildings that, safe from rising tides, would allow the slum’s residents to remain within their community, while at the same time improving the quality of their lives.
His studio has come up with an easy-to-build, low-cost sustainable prototype for a floating building, one of which is already being coveted by an overcrowded local school.

Read & see: http://www.aljazeera.com/working-water

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Meet Alfredo Brillembourg Of Urban-Think Tank

Alfredo Brillembourg

Alfredo Brillembourg

Meet Alfredo Brillembourg, a Venezuelan architect  and founder of Urban-Think Tank (U-TT) , a company described as “.. an interdisciplinary design practice dedicated to high-level research and design on a variety of subjects, concerned with contemporary architecture and urbanism.”.  The U-TT operates with offices in Caracas, São Paulo, New York, and Zürich – its positioned to serve clients and work on projects all over the world.

Read & see: http://futurecapetown.com/alfredo-brillembourg

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Thomas Hylland Eriksen ~ Open Access And The Academic Gift Economy

EriksenNo, I’m not arguing that everything should be free. Just academic articles. And I mean really free, in most senses of the word.

Last week, the University of Oslo organised a conference about publishing, with a special focus on Open Access and the Creative Commons. Like many institutions, UiO has an explicit policy in favour of open access publishing, and new employees have to sign a contract where they vow to make their publications freely available, if at all possible.
The ‘if at all possible’ caveat is an interesting one, and I’ll return to it very soon.

Open access comes in three main flavours – gold, green and hybrid. Gold means freely available to everybody. Green means that the author has placed the original manuscript, but not the pdf of the publication, in an open archive – at UiO, it is called Duo. Hybrid means that the author pays a non-open access journal to make their publication freely available.

Read more: http://thomashyllanderiksen.net/open-access

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